Oct.2023 24
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Electrochemical Deburring
Details

Electrochemical Deburring (ECD) is a metal removal process that operates without physical contact, utilizing low-voltage direct current and non-toxic salt electrolytes to safely and selectively eliminate burrs. In this "reverse plating" action, burrs are dissolved, distinct from traditional plating, as the removed metal is transformed into fine metal hydroxide particles. These particles are subsequently carried away from the workpiece by the electrolyte and can be separated via filtration.

For instance, consider the scenario of deburring two intersecting holes. Initially, a negatively charged electrode (cathode) is inserted into an internal passage of the workpiece, with insulation except at the precise tip, strategically placed at the intersection of the holes. The workpiece is then secured onto a fixture and connected to the positive side of the power supply, acting as an anode. While electrolyte flows through the workpiece, the current is activated for a duration of 10 to 30 seconds. At this point, metal is removed at the hole intersection due to the electrode's precise positioning, resulting in swift deburring and radius formation. Multiple electrodes can be employed to simultaneously address various intersections. After the cycle concludes, the current is deactivated, electrolyte flow ceases, and the part is removed from the fixture. A rinse with water or a rust inhibitor solution (for mild steel workpieces) finalizes the process.

In a common application involving the deburring of intersecting holes, the workpiece is placed on a fixture, a negatively charged electrode (cathode) is introduced into an internal passage, and the workpiece is connected as the anode. Electrolyte is passed through the workpiece, and the current is applied for a brief period of 10 to 30 seconds. The cathode's precise positioning within the workpiece ensures that burrs at the intersection of the holes are effectively addressed, resulting in quick deburring and radius formation. Multiple electrodes can be employed for simultaneous deburring of multiple intersections. At the end of the cycle, the current is switched off, electrolyte flow stops, and the part is removed from the fixture, requiring a simple rinse with water or a rust inhibitor solution for mild steel workpieces.

This process involves three primary components: a fixture, the machine, and the electrolyte.